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More Bad Pizza- Winner TOTW 2-10-2018

Posted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:59 pm
by Jerry Maske
Actually, it came out better than it had any right to. I'm learning about how to smooth and seal end grain. If you don't, the black paint will get sucked into it and leave a disgusting surface. Hard to believe, but that's what happened. Took a lot of sanding and sealing to beat it but I got there. Having a lot of fun with the air brush too. I like the idea of designing on the fly, so to speak. Need to experiment with other colors.

C&C always welcome

Jerry
DSC_0057.jpg

Re: More Bad Pizza

Posted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 2:02 pm
by Mike Cruz
Hehe, in a strange way, I think the natural wood distracts from your painting! Cool effect.

Re: More Bad Pizza

Posted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 2:15 pm
by Jerry Maske
Mike,
Leaving the center open like that is only one option. I could have painted it black and put a flower in there. I could have gilded it with gold. Or I could have left it flat and put some other curious thing in the center. And that's the problem; too many options. This one was an exercise, or prototype anyway, but I may get back to the center with some gilding.

Any other suggestions?

Re: More Bad Pizza

Posted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 7:53 am
by Mike Foster
Very nice Jerry. I think I agree about the bare wood on this one. Those paints are pretty awesome. You didn't say but are those the sonja? paints that other folks have been using? Electric colors that look fun to play with.

Re: More Bad Pizza

Posted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 9:48 am
by Jerry Maske
Mike,
Yes they are. There's an excellent You Tube video by Tim Yoder. Go to You Tube and search for "Cosmic Cloud." His will come up and you'll have the most entertaining half hour of wood turning you've ever seen. He's great as a turner, an artist and fun to listen to. In his process, he leaves nothing out and explains everything in depth so you really can come away knowing how the process is done.

That's really important to me. I like going to a project with the "How" part totally understood. That releases me to do the "What" without worrying about whether or not I know How to do it. Tim shows the "How" part perfectly. There's a little learning curve with getting the paints thinned to a workable consistency and how much air pressure to let through your air brush, but that's not hard to figure out.

Check out Tim's video and you'll have all your questions answered.

Jerry

Re: More Bad Pizza

Posted: Mon Feb 05, 2018 3:01 pm
by Jim Seyfried
If this is just learning you must be an incredibly fast learner! I think it looks great. Having just bought an airbrush myself your information and suggestions are greatly appreciated. So far all I have done is make dots, lines, and a few tapered lines. :lol: I'm a Tim Yoder fan and will check out his video shortly.

Re: More Bad Pizza

Posted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:48 am
by Jerry Maske
Jim,
I can't use an air brush! Tim and I both cheat with it. We put a pea sized drop of the paint directly onto the black surface and use the air brush to move it around. You'd NEVER get the kinds of designs he and I get using it in the traditional way, but you'd probably get something pretty regardless.

If you watch his video, the thing he does I don't care for is that he jams all his patterns together with no black spacing between them. Well, maybe. I did one like that and didn't care for it. The one I pictured here has a lot of the black showing through and, in my humble opinion, is a much nicer display, but that's personal aesthetics only.

One other "Neat" trick about all this, is that if you didn't get a good seal on the wood, it WILL show through. But you CAN cover it with the colors. Can you find the places where I had to do that? Of course not. There were two places that I could not get a good seal and put my design on top to cover it. Then, when I examined the finished product under a bright light, I found a tool mark just inside the smaller band all the way around. Didn't see it until the very end, but that's the way of things. So I built up the design to cover it so no one will ever find it. Now, I've given away a secret and if you tell anyone, I'll have to kill you. Seriously, this is a neat process. I'm going to try some other kinds of wood and may even do some gilding in the middle. Lots of options.

Something I did to get comfortable was to watch Tim's video a couple of times, gather all the material together and get a scrap piece of Something and do the whole thing on that. You'll get comfortable with it more quickly and if you screw something up, it's on scrap to begin with. Sand it off and try again. You can see what colors go together and how to get the patterns you want. There is a bit of a learning curve with how much air to use at first, and then as the paint is drying, how much air to use then. That's how you get the different designs and that's the REAL fun part. I totally enjoy myself doing the coloring. No lines I have to stay inside of and lots of folks that can't figure out how I do it. So grab a piece of scrap pine out of Home Depot's cull pile, sand it as smooth as you can, seal it with several coats, put on the black and go after it.

The main part of this is to have fun and remember that whatever method or design you come up with that pleases you, that's all that's important. And if I can help along the way, I'd be pleased to do so. Lots of folks have helped me.

Good luck, keep in touch and post pictures.

Jerry

Re: More Bad Pizza

Posted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:38 am
by Jim Seyfried
Jerry,

Thanks for the detailed explanation! After my first reply I did watch Tim's video and that is a cool method. It was cool, I watched it on Youtube my TV. Over the weekend a friend told me about being able to do that on a smart TV. So I learned a couple of things. :D

Re: More Bad Pizza

Posted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 12:18 pm
by Jerry Maske
Jim,
Glad you're learning. Never too old! Tim refers to another guy in Scotland that he, Tim, says does exceptional work. I looked him up and he does a different style, so he's worth watching if for no other reason. I'm not impressed by his paint work, but it's one more process to know about.

I came to an awareness this morning that I'm embarrassed to admit to. I'd shaped a 9" bowl using Tim's process and left the top with the screw holes in it. I sanded it down to 400 grit and could see the reflection of my lathe ways in the wood surface; I like that. Started the seal process and realized that the moisture in the seal was actually raising the grain! So I sanded it again, sealed it again and the same thing happened, but to a lesser degree. Did all that three times before I could put on a coat of seal and, after drying, did NOT feel grain sticking up. So, this one has black paint drying. I will probably do the final turning and cut in the rings this afternoon. Then tomorrow it'll be ready for colors.

Also, I watched Tim do his sanding and learned a new trick. He used a power tool with a sanding pad on the end. I'd never seen that done before, but I'll tell you this; you CANT' get a finish as smooth as that process produces. And it's FAST! I don't know how it would work on the outside of an "Ogee" shape, for example because you probably couldn't get the pad to fit into the curves. But it's a process that's worth knowing.

Anyway, I've got another medium sized half log I trimmed the pith out of yesterday that's too wet to finish, but ready to be rough turned. Busy afternoon but we've got a storm coming our way any minute. The way our house and garage are set up, the snow tends to drift pretty badly right in front of the garage door and that keeps me from getting inside unless I want to do a bunch of shoveling. Then I close the garage door behind me, and when I'm ready to come out, as I open the door, all the newly drifted snow falls inside. I'd really rather not go through all that. So I'm going to hit it until the stuff starts falling and drifting. 6-9" is the prediction and that's not much to worry about. But it's a good excuse to put some coffee liquor into some hot chocolate and settle with a good book.

Jerry

Re: More Bad Pizza

Posted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 10:09 am
by Michael Gibson
It is my turn for TOTW and like like Mike the week before l am torn between two. First l love the finished piece. Second love that you keep experimenting until you got it right. I have shelves full of pieces l have experimented with but not good enough to show, persevere and you can get the results you are looking for, and the ones that follow will be even better.
This is my pick for TOTW.

Re: More Bad Pizza- Winner TOTW 2-10-2018

Posted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 1:53 pm
by Josh Bowman
Congratulations!
Here's the Facebook link for sharing:http://woodturnersunlimited.com/index.p ... Itemid=147

Re: More Bad Pizza- Winner TOTW 2-10-2018

Posted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 3:05 pm
by Jim Seyfried
Congratulations Jerry! Looking forward to seeing more of this style!

Re: More Bad Pizza- Winner TOTW 2-10-2018

Posted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 10:32 pm
by Steve Schlumpf
Congrats on winning the TOTW honors Jerry! Looking forward to seeing more of this painting technique!

Re: More Bad Pizza- Winner TOTW 2-10-2018

Posted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:55 am
by Jerry Maske
Have to admit; I didn't know what "TOTW" was. And now that the honor has been bestowed on me, I don't know what to say. Most times I feel like an inept rookie at turning. I do get some stuff to come out pretty good but I really have to work at it.

These paintings are a pain in the Butt to get ready to add colors. If there's any rough or unsealed grain, you can expect imperfections in the surface. And I think they look best with a perfectly smooth, mirror finish that isn't easy to get. Maple seems to be okay to work with, but I just tried one in African Mahogany that I could not get smooth no matter what I did. It's pictured elsewhere on the board.

So experimenting is necessary. I just ordered a big piece of Purple Heart to try out and I'll post that one as it gets done. We all know how much fun Purple Heart is to work with, so don't expect anything for awhile.

Thanks again for the honor.

Jerry

Re: More Bad Pizza- Winner TOTW 2-10-2018

Posted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:55 pm
by Bob Rotche
Late to the party as I've been out of the country for several weeks but looks like you did a great job! Hard to believe you're just figuring the technique out. Congrats on a well deserved TOTW.

Re: More Bad Pizza- Winner TOTW 2-10-2018

Posted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:44 pm
by Chuck Jones
Jerry another late congratulations on TOTW. I too have been out of pocket for a while, but not travelling to exotic places like someone who just posted above. :D

That is an interesting technique you are playing with here. We had a demo at our local club a few weeks ago and my wife is experimenting with something similar on glass.

Re: More Bad Pizza- Winner TOTW 2-10-2018

Posted: Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:46 am
by Jerry Maske
Chuck,
I'd be interested in what your wife is doing on glass. I've been a glass crafter/caster for about 40 years. Not much about glass crafting I haven't tried and gotten good enough at to earn a living at it. Is she going to try fusing? Or is this just painting? Anyway, glad I inspired her.

I just got a note from UPS that the block of Purple Heart I ordered is arriving today, so I'll have a new color wood to try all this on. I don't know how the Purple Heart color will look in the center. But if it doesn't work, I'll do something else with it. Maybe cast a piece of glass to go in the center. Hadn't though about that. Hmmm; what have you done to me?

Jerry

Re: More Bad Pizza- Winner TOTW 2-10-2018

Posted: Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:14 pm
by Chuck Jones
Jerry Maske wrote:
Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:46 am
Chuck,
I'd be interested in what your wife is doing on glass. ...
Jerry
Jerry, I'm neither authorized nor qualified to speak accurately about my wife Glenda's glass activity. I just recite the buzzwords I've picked up. She started out making stained glass panels and windows years ago. Then got into lampworking, making beads, marbles, flowers, and such. Next was fusing and slumping. She has one small and two large kilns. Lately she is experimenting with a couple "painting" techniques. One is with an acrylic paint similar to Jo Sonja which, as I now understand, she does that mostly on canvas. Another is applying material that looks like crushed glass in a media to glass, then fusing and/or slumping it. Bias aside I think she is doing some very nice work with that.

As everyone knows glass is difficult to photograph and neither of us is skilled at photography, but there is a small sample of Glenda's work on her web site. Looking at it tonight I realize we need to take time to add some of the more recent work.

Re: More Bad Pizza- Winner TOTW 2-10-2018

Posted: Fri Feb 16, 2018 9:34 am
by Jerry Maske
Chuck,
You're wife is to be commended. I DO know a lot about the style of glasswork she's doing, and she's doing a great job. Slumping is the basic part of kiln work. Easy, but has enough to it that if you forget to do something, you won't like what you find in the morning. Anyway, my speciality was CASTING. I'd make a model out of wax, form a mold of casting plaster around it, melt the wax out, fill the hole with glass in one form or another and crank up the heat. That process might take as much as a couple of months, depending on how thick the plaster was; it has to be totally dry. And, even in rural Maine, we made a pretty decent living in the glass business for about ten years. It can be done, but it's a lot of work. If Glenda or you would like to hear more, I'd be glad to share with you. I'll send you my email and we can hash all that out.

My wife approaches the crafts on a path I can't find and probably would never take even if I could. So we are a great collaboration because we come to the same project from such different directions that, when we do collaborate, strange and wonderful things can happen. I'm more conservative and technically oriented. She, however, lets me teach her the techniques and then asks, "What if we did it THIS way?" And I usually hand her a block of wood or stack of glass and get out of her way. Some quite remarkable things have come out of all that.

Now, your "Task" should you decide to accept it, is to see if she can add something to your work. Or, the other way around. Ann made a series of beautiful 1" square tiles and inlaid them into a large piece of Oak. Added Turkey feathers and some other things and we have a rather large vase unlike anything you'll ever see again. Finely ground glass is a great inlay product. If people can use coffee grounds, why not use glass? So the possibilities are virtually endless. And as competent as your bride obviously is, I suspect if you sat with her in a brainstorming session, you'd be amazed what she could come up with. We do that most mornings at breakfast.

So please tell her that she's received some high praise from someone that doesn't offer it lightly. Her work is quite nice. Some of it is pedestrian, but you need some of that. Other pieces are stunning. I wouldn't want to compete against her. Now, get her looking at YOUR work to see how she can enhance what you've already accomplished, or the other way around. Wood and glass do go together.

Good luck,
Jerry